THE ORCHESTRA NOW (TŌN) PERFORMS BRUCH AND MAHLER AT THE FISHER CENTER AT BARD COLLEGE
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13 AT 8 PM
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14 AT 3 PM

Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, January 29, 2016 Music Director Leon Botstein will conduct The Orchestra Now in a winter weekend concert of Bruch and Mahler featuring young Chinese violinist Tianpei Ai and vocalists Susan Platts and Charles Reid, on February 13-14. The concerts are part of the Orchestra’s inaugural performance season in residence at Bard College, designed to offer adventurous programs of familiar and lesser-known works in the incomparable Sosnoff Theater.

TŌN’s next performances at Bard College will take place on April 9-10, 2016 and will feature Handel’s Messiah performed with soloists from the Graduate Vocal Arts Program, Bard Festival Chorus, and Bard Chamber Chorus.

Saturday, February 13, 2016 at 8 PM, & Sunday, February 14 at 3 PM
The Fisher Center at Bard College, Sosnoff Theater
The program begins with one of Bruch’s signature pieces, his 1880 Scottish Fantasy for violin and orchestra, a four-movement work on Scottish folk melodies. Originally dedicated to the virtuoso violinist Pablo de Sarasate, the young soloist on these concerts will be Tianpei Ai, former concertmaster of the Asian Youth Orchestra. As part of his tribute to Scottish tradition, listeners will likewise hear the prominence given to the harp in Bruch’s composition. The performance will also present one of Mahler’s best-loved works, Das Lied von der Erde with mezzo-soprano Susan Platts and tenor Charles Reid. Written during a dark time in the composer’s life, Mahler was moved to write the six songs in his work by a collection of Chinese verse about the end of life.  All but a symphony in name, Mahler also avoided calling Das Lied his ninth symphony, since many composers died after writing their ninth.

The Orchestra Now
Leon Botstein
, Conductor
Tianpei Ai, Violin
Susan Platts, Mezzo-soprano
Charles Reid, Tenor
Bruch: Scottish Fantasy
Mahler: Das Lied von der Erde (“The Song of the Earth“)

Tickets: $25–$35. Tickets available by calling the box office at 845-758-7900, in person at the Sosnoff Theater box office, or by visiting the website at fishercenter.bard.edu.

About The Orchestra Now
Founded in 2015, The Orchestra Now is an innovative training orchestra and master’s degree program at Bard College that is preparing a new generation of musicians to break down barriers between modern audiences and great orchestral music of the past and present. Under the leadership of conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein, TŌN mines the wealth of underperformed repertoire, reimagines traditional concert formats, and strives to make the experience of the performers a part of the listeners’ experience. The musicians of TŌN hail from across the U.S. and six other countries: Hungary, Korea, China, Japan, Canada and Venezuela. In addition to a concert series at their home base—the stunning Frank Gehry-designed Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College—they perform multiple concerts each season at Carnegie Hall and offer free concerts at venues across the boroughs of New York City. At the Metropolitan Museum of Art they join TŌN’s Music Director Leon Botstein in the series Sight & Sound as he pairs orchestral works with masterpieces from the museum’s collection. In addition to Mr. Botstein and TŌN’s Associate Conductor and Academic Director, James Bagwell, guest conductors in the inaugural season include JoAnn Falletta, Marcelo Lehninger, and Gerard Schwarz. For more information, visit www.theorchestranow.org.

Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein brings a renowned career as both an educator and a conductor to his role as founder of Bard College’s new master’s degree program and Music Director of The Orchestra Now. He has been the President of Bard College since 1975, co-Artistic Director of Bard SummerScape and the Bard Music Festival since their creation, and Music Director of the American Symphony Orchestra since 1992. He also served as the Music Director of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra from 2003 to 2011 and is now Conductor Laureate. Mr. Botstein has an active career as a guest conductor with orchestras around the globe and has made numerous recordings, as well as being a prolific author and music historian. He has received numerous honors for his contributions to the music industry. More info online at LeonBotsteinMusicRoom.com.

Press contacts:
Pascal Nadon
Pascal Nadon Communications
Phone: 646.234.7088
Email: pascal@pascalnadon.com

Mark Primoff
Associate Vice President of Communications
Bard College
Phone: 845.758.7412
Email: primoff@bard.edu

THE ORCHESTRA NOW (TŌN) PERFORMS STRAUSS, WATTEAU & NOSTALGIA AS PART OF ITS SIGHT & SOUND SERIES AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 7 AT 2 PM

Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, January 14, 2016 The Orchestra Now, the innovative new master’s degree program and graduate training orchestra founded by Bard College in 2015, will perform Strauss, Watteau & Nostalgia, the second in its three-concert Sight & Sound series at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on Sunday, February 7 at 2 PM.  Conductor and musicologist Leon Botstein will lead the international orchestra of young musicians, discuss Strauss’ work to draw parallels between visual art and music, and engage the audience with a lively Q&A.

The final Sight & Sound concert of the season, titled Mendelssohn, Turner & Romantic Imagination, will take place on Sunday, May 22, 2016.

Sunday, Feb. 7, at 2 PM, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Sight & Sound: Strauss, Watteau & Nostalgia
Strauss, who was obsessed with the past, wrote music for a 1912 update of Molière’s play Le bourgeois gentilhomme, combining the play with the one-act opera Ariadne auf Naxos. The result was a lengthy work that was costly to produce, so Strauss later transformed the score into an orchestral suite that premiered in Vienna under the baton of the composer in 1920. This program sets his work alongside the old-fashioned figures in Antoine Watteau’s 1721 painting of a theatre scene, The French Comedians. Watteau was best known for painting peaceful rural scenes and for creating the fête galante genre, which typically shows the playfully amorous activity of elegant men and women in a country setting. Many of his works were inspired by Italian comedies and ballets.
Leon Botstein, conductor
Strauss: Le bourgeois gentilhomme
Watteau: The French Comedians

Tickets to this event include Museum admission, come early and view the painting that inspired this performance.

Tickets start at $30; available at theorchestranow.orgmetmuseum.org/tickets, 212-570-3949, or at the Metropolitan Museum’s Great Hall box office, which is open Monday-Saturday, 11:00 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
Tickets include admission to the Museum on day of performance. $1 tickets for children ages 7-16 when accompanied by an adult with a full-price ticket.

About The Orchestra Now
TŌN was founded in 2015 as a graduate training orchestra and three-year master’s degree program designed to prepare musicians for facing the modern symphony orchestra. The Orchestra’s creation is based on the belief that to survive today’s musical landscape, contemporary musicians must go beyond the perfection of performance skills and repertoire. They must learn how to connect with concertgoers and create new ways to break down the barriers of reaching new audiences. To achieve this goal, the innovative TŌN curriculum involves both practical and academic activity comprising intensive, regular weekly orchestra rehearsal and course study with Bard College faculty, guest scholars, and performing artists. A Teaching Artist Program provides opportunities for students to engage in community outreach and education programs, and the graduate curriculum culminates in such independent study projects as managing a performing ensemble, curating a program that explores a topic of social importance, or working with community members to express life experiences through music. Musicians are selected through an audition process. All participants selected for the program will earn a Masters of Music in Curatorial, Critical, and Performance Studies, and receive a full-tuition scholarship and health benefits. For more information, visit www.theorchestranow.org

Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein brings a renowned career as both an educator and a conductor to his role as founder of Bard College’s new master’s degree program and Music Director of The Orchestra Now. He has been the President of Bard College since 1975, co-Artistic Director of Bard SummerScape and the Bard Music Festival since their creation, and Music Director of the American Symphony Orchestra since 1992. He also served as the Music Director of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra from 2003 to 2011 and is now Conductor Laureate. Mr. Botstein has an active career as a guest conductor with orchestras around the globe and has made numerous recordings, as well as being a prolific author and music historian. He has received numerous honors for his contributions to the music industry.  More info online at LeonBotsteinMusicRoom.com.

About MetLiveArts
The live arts series at The Metropolitan Museum of Art that explores contemporary performance through the lens of the Museum’s exhibitions and unparalleled gallery spaces with singular performances and talks. MetLiveArts invites artists, performers, curators, and thought-leaders to explore and collaborate within the Met, leading with groundbreaking commissions, world premieres, and site-specific durational performances. For more information about MetLiveArts, please visit: www.metmuseum.org/tickets

Press contact:
Pascal Nadon
Pascal Nadon Communications
Phone: 646.234.7088
Email: pascal@pascalnadon.com

Musicians write about what it’s like playing in TŌN

TŌN musicians Zachary Boeding and Thomas J Wible have written an article for the blog Musicovation discussing their first four months playing in The Orchestra Now and describing the program from the musician’s point of view.

“If we keep to tradition, we’ll have nothing but that. If we keep to tradition, we’re only silencing ourselves in a way. TŌN aims to help create a musician who not only can play, but one who can lure and intrigue his own contemporaries. We are being shown after much intense musical training how to be whom we want within ourselves and within our art.”

Photo by David DeNee

THE ORCHESTRA NOW (TŌN) MAKES CARNEGIE HALL DEBUT WITH NEW CONCERT SERIES ON FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2016 AT 7:30 PM

Beethoven’s “Likes” Program Features the U.S. Premiere of Reicha’s Symphony No. 3 and the N.Y. Premiere of Ries’ Piano Concerto No. 8

Annandale-on-the-Hudson, NY, January 6, 2016 — After launching three new concert series and offering nine performances in Fall 2015 for its inaugural season, The Orchestra Now will make its anticipated Carnegie Hall debut on Friday, January 29 at 7:30 pm. The evening inaugurates the new ensemble’s two-concert series at the world-famous music hall; the second evening at Carnegie Hall will take place on May 13, 2016.

Titled Beethoven’s “Likes,” the January program will present one of the most celebrated works in all of classical music, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5, performed alongside pieces written by one of his friends, one of his students, and his favorite composer of the period. Beethoven’s Fifth was written over four years while Beethoven struggled with going deaf and Vienna was occupied by Napoleon’s army. The Symphony finally premiered in a freezing cold auditorium after only one rehearsal. The compositions juxtaposing his work on the program include a piece by the man Beethoven considered the greatest living composer of the time, the overture from Les deux journées, Luigi Cherubini’s most popular opera. Beethoven and Anton Reicha were friends and studied together as teens. This U.S. premiere of his Symphony No. 3 is one of four symphonies Reicha composed in 1808, the year that Beethoven’s 5th and 6th Symphonies premiered. Ferdinand Ries was a piano student of Beethoven’s, and also worked as his secretary and copyist. Australian pianist Piers Lane, Artistic Director of the 2016 Sydney International Piano Competition, will perform the N.Y. premiere of Ries’ Piano Concerto No. 8, which was written just a year before Beethoven’s death. A decade later, he co-wrote one of the first biographies of his teacher.

The Carnegie Hall series is one of four separate concert series that launched during the Orchestra’s 2015-16 season, including those at Bard College, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and a schedule of FREE concerts throughout New York City boroughs that features guest conductors including JoAnn Falletta, James Bagwell, Zachary Schwartzman and Gerard Schwarz. The next concert in the Sight & Sound series, Strauss, Watteau & Nostalgia, will take place at The Metropolitan Museum on Sunday, February 7, 2016 at 2 pm.

Friday, January 29 2016 at 7:30 pm, Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage at Carnegie Hall
Beethoven’s “Likes”
Leon Botstein, conductor
Piers Lane, piano
Cherubini: Overture from Les deux journées
Reicha: Symphony No. 3 in F major (U.S. premiere)  
Ries: Piano Concerto No. 8 (N.Y. premiere)
Beethoven: Symphony No. 5

Additional information on the program is available here.

Tickets, priced from $25–$75, are available at CarnegieHall.org, at the Carnegie box office, or by calling CarnegieCharge at 212.247.7800.

About The Orchestra Now
Founded in 2015, The Orchestra Now is an innovative training orchestra and master’s degree program at Bard College that is preparing a new generation of musicians to break down barriers between modern audiences and great orchestral music of the past and present. Under the leadership of conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein, TŌN mines the wealth of underperformed repertoire, reimagines traditional concert formats, and strives to make the experience of the performers a part of the listeners’ experience. The musicians of TŌN hail from across the U.S. and six other countries: Hungary, Korea, China, Japan, Canada and Venezuela. In addition to a concert series at their home base—the stunning Frank Gehry-designed Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College—they perform multiple concerts each season at Carnegie Hall and offer free concerts at venues across the boroughs of New York City. At the Metropolitan Museum of Art they join TŌN’s Music Director Leon Botstein in the series Sight & Sound as he pairs orchestral works with masterpieces from the museum’s collection. In addition to Mr. Botstein and TŌN’s Associate Conductor and Academic Director, James Bagwell, guest conductors in the inaugural season include JoAnn Falletta, Marcelo Lehninger, and Gerard Schwarz. For more information, visit www.theorchestranow.org.

Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein brings a renowned career as both an educator and a conductor to his role as founder of Bard College’s new master’s degree program and Music Director of The Orchestra Now. He has been the President of Bard College since 1975, co-Artistic Director of Bard SummerScape and the Bard Music Festival since their creation, and Music Director of the American Symphony Orchestra since 1992. He also served as the Music Director of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra from 2003 to 2011 and is now Conductor Laureate. Mr. Botstein has an active career as a guest conductor with orchestras around the globe and has made numerous recordings, as well as being a prolific author and music historian. He has received numerous honors for his contributions to the music industry.  More info online at LeonBotsteinMusicRoom.com.

Press contact:
Pascal Nadon
Pascal Nadon Communications
Phone: 646.234.7088
Email: pascal@pascalnadon.com