Season 3 of Sight & Sound now on sale!

The Orchestra Now’s popular series Sight & Sound continues at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2017–18, and tickets are now on sale! At each event, conductor and music historian Leon Botstein explores the parallels between orchestral music and the visual arts. First, on-screen artworks are discussed alongside musical excerpts performed by The Orchestra Now. Then, a full performance and audience Q&A.

Season 3 includes Schoenberg‘s Erwartung (“Expectation“) with the artwork of MunchShostakovich‘s Suite on Verses of Michelangelo with the artwork of Michelangelo, and Debussy‘s Nocturnes with the artwork of the French Impressionists. The 3-concert series starts at just $75 and single tickets start at $30.

>Click here to browse the concerts and purchase tickets

Photo by David DeNee

Adina Tsai: No guts, no glory

Violin player Adina Tsai is featured in the latest edition of our video series TŌN Close-Ups.

She talks about her earliest musical memories, her favorite parts of playing in The Orchestra Now, and the surprising way livestock have been involved in making violins.

Announcing Season 3

The Orchestra Now is proud to announce it’s third season of concerts, featuring five concert series with novel programs offering wide-ranging repertoire.

FISHER CENTER SERIES
The Orchestra Now’s residency at Bard College’s Fisher Center resumes with another season of moving music, from Mussorgsky’s haunting Night on Bald Mountain to Beethoven’s joyous Ninth Symphony.

CARNEGIE HALL SERIES
Showcasing underperformed repertoire, this year’s series shines a light on symphonies, with conductor Leon Botstein leading four symphonic works by Herrmann, Korngold, Lajtha, and Saygun, in addition to Bartók‘s imaginative and colorful Concerto for Two Pianos, Percussion, and Orchestra.

SIGHT & SOUND AT THE MET MUSEUM
Sight & Sound, one of TŌN’s most popular series, returns to The Met Museum where the orchestra, with conductor and music historian Leon Botstein, explores the parallels between orchestral music and the visual arts. First, on-screen artworks are discussed alongside musical excerpts performed by The Orchestra Now, followed by a full performance and audience Q&A.

LINCOLN CENTER SERIES
TŌN returns to Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater for two concerts with music ranging from Rubinstein to Berlioz.

AROUND TOWN – FREE CONCERTS
TŌN continues this series of free concerts at multiple venues in New York City and beyond, providing families with an opportunity to attend their first orchestral performance and expose a new generation to classical music.

SPECIAL EVENT: FALLETTA CONDUCTS THE PLANETS
JoAnn Falletta, music director of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra and the Virginia Symphony Orchestra, returns to TŌN as a guest conductor for the third consecutive year, leading the orchestra in Holst‘s masterpiece The Planets.

>>Explore all Season 3 concerts

Photo by Jito Lee

Announcing Season 3 at the Fisher Center

The Orchestra Now’s residency at the Fisher Center at Bard College continues in 2017–18 with a third season of stirring music, from Mussorgsky’s haunting Night on Bald Mountain to Beethoven’s joyous Ninth Symphony and Stravinsky’s revolutionary Rite of Spring. Soloists include the winner of TŌN’s 2017 concerto competition, and winners of Bard College Conservatory’s 2016 concerto competition.

>Click here to browse the concerts

Full-season subscriptions are now on sale. Packages of 3 or 4 Fisher Center concerts go on sale in mid-May. Single tickets go on sale in early August.

Photo by Matt Dine

Make Our Garden Grow

Note: These events occurred in February 2017.

The musicians of TŌN are proud to present two weekends of FREE chamber music concerts Feb 10-11 & 19 in Rhinebeck, Hudson, Kingston, Tivoli, and more, all inspired by Voltaire’s Candide. It all culminates in their performance of Leonard Bernstein’s Candide on Feb 25/26.

>Chamber Music Festival Details

Photo by David DeNee

Eleanor Lee: Let’s get physical

The January edition of our video series TŌN Close-Ups spotlights cello player Eleanor Lee.

She talks about the physicality of playing an instrument, the link between the cello and the human voice, and her hopes for the future of classical music.